Follow by Email

Monday, August 27, 2007

Summer Reading Thing 2007: Two strikes, one homer

Strike one . . .

This is the second James Patterson novel I have read, well, the second one I've picked up--I didn't finish reading it. I made it to about the 4th chapter, which was about two chapters further than I ought to have gone. I must be getting old, but I just don't tolerate the icky stuff I used to not mind so much. The thing is, I love a good mystery. I love the drama, I love the conflict, I love the intensity and the way my heart races--and yet I don't want sexual sadism or stomach churning descriptions. The crux of the 'killer' in this book was "What's the worst thing anyone has ever done?" and I'm assuming the rest of the book is his attempts to top himself after killing newlyweds. No thanks. I will likely try a Patterson again, since I liked the other book by him that I read, but I'll be more careful in the ones I spend my time and money on. I paid $8 for it and gave it to DI.



Strike Two . . .

This was my stretch book--what does it say about me that I could not reach it? The paperback I got from the library was 704 pages--daunting for me if there are no Hippogriffs--and I made it to page 43. I enjoyed those 43 pages, or at least the 20% or so that I could make sense of. The information was interesting, but the context was one I have such little understanding of that it took me hours and hours to read these pages and there was just so much I didn't understand. I felt it was written for someone that already knew the basics of Einstein, for instance it would introduce someone and add a snippet about how important this person later was to Einstein's discovering of Quantum Grifindorum--but as this happened over and over again, it led me to feel even more out of the loop than ever. So, I called uncle, but with good feelings as we parted ways. I find Einstein fascinating and love what I did learn about him. Maybe if I had more disposable time I would invest it here, maybe there is another biography that is easier to read. Either way, this book was not for me.


Home Run!

I didn't set this up as my stretch book, but since pulling a muscle on Einstein, this could take it's place. The title is 'Simplify' but that does not mean it's simple. In fact, I started this book in April and finished it in August, I followed the author's advice to read one chapter at a time, often going weeks in between so that I could really bring the chapter home in my life and make it work. When I closed the book I felt as if the things I had learned were ones I really could count on to make my life a little better, a little richer, a little easier to navigate. I loved the authors not-perfect voice, I loved her realness, and I loved the topics she chose to focus on. I am not a big self-help reader, I find most self-help books to be idealistic and guilt-driven, but this was neither of those things, at least to me. I highly recommend this to anyone that would like to simplify, and needs to be challenged, but doesn't want to feel preached to or hit over the head with it. The advice in the book is something you can fit to any life and feel good about.

3 comments:

Karlene said...

I have the first four paperbacks in that James Patterson series--hand-me-downs, thank goodness. My daughter read them, then gave them to me instead of D.I.

She said, "Mom, you've talked about plot holes for years. Now I finally get what you mean." She also said the suspense was good, so I was thinking I'd read it. But now, maybe not.

Kimberly said...

Ooo...that last one sounds right up my alley...

Heather B. Moore said...

I read a James Patterson suspense a few years ago. I didn't finish it. His female character was too garish for my taste. I sold it on Ebay :)